Mark Acton Photography

gboyglobaltour:

Balade dans Shibuya part 3, ainsi que pres de la Tokyo Tower, a Harajuku, et dans les ruelles du quartier de Koenji…

andrewharlow:

Selections from Amir Zaki’s Time Moves Still

The title refers to the common adage, “Time Stands Still.” Each of the photos in the exhibition is compiled from 40-100 individual images. Therefore, the pictures represent 10-15 minutes of time passing by.

For instance, the trees have an almost painful degree of resolution, which would imply an instantaneous exposure with an incredibly sharp lens. But, they also contain areas of softness and blur, moments when the wind may have picked up during exposure, which imply movement and the passing of time.

(Source: andrewharlow)

photojojo:

Photographs of dancers in motion stand in a crowded field, but these shots by Brian Kuhlmann really grabbed our attention. Initially, Brian was inspired by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010.

Using a few friends who were professional dancers, Brian photographed their motions in a way that seems like they’re underwater.

Dancers in Motion Appear to be Underwater

via Pop Photo

latimes:

It turns out the ancient universe is even more ancient
New findings from the European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope suggest that the universe is an estimated 13.8 billion years old, 100 million years older than previous thought.
Take a look at the picture above - that’s the radiation imprinted on the sky by the Big Bang itself, an observation from Planck that proved pivotal to the new age estimate.
From Science Now:

The map represents the first 15.5 months of observation by the Planck space telescope, which looked at the universe’s cosmic microwave background — that extremely cold, barely noticeable glow left after the Big Bang when the universe was just a cosmic baby — about 380,000 years old.


But don’t worry universe, you don’t look a day over 12 billion.Photo: ESA, Planck Collaboration, NASA / Associated Press

latimes:

It turns out the ancient universe is even more ancient

New findings from the European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope suggest that the universe is an estimated 13.8 billion years old, 100 million years older than previous thought.

Take a look at the picture above - that’s the radiation imprinted on the sky by the Big Bang itself, an observation from Planck that proved pivotal to the new age estimate.

From Science Now:

The map represents the first 15.5 months of observation by the Planck space telescope, which looked at the universe’s cosmic microwave background — that extremely cold, barely noticeable glow left after the Big Bang when the universe was just a cosmic baby — about 380,000 years old.

But don’t worry universe, you don’t look a day over 12 billion.

Photo: ESA, Planck Collaboration, NASA / Associated Press

latimes:

So…did Voyager 1 leave the solar system or not?A report from the Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, claimed earlier today that the long-traveling Voyager 1 spacecraft had departed the solar system:

“It appears that V1 has exited the main solar modulation region, revealing Hydrogen and Helium spectra characteristic of those to be expected in the local interstellar medium.”

But NASA disagrees, according to a statement from Edward Stone, a Voyager project scientist based at Caltech:

“It is the consensus of the Voyager science team that Voyager 1 has not yet left the solar system or reached interstellar space.
In December 2012, the Voyager science team reported that Voyager 1 is within a new region called ‘the magnetic highway,’ where energetic particles changed dramatically. A change in the direction of the magnetic field is the last critical indicator of reaching interstellar space, and that change of direction has not yet been observed.”

Our money’s on the folks over at NASA. Read more on the debate over at Science Now.
Photo: NASA

latimes:

So…did Voyager 1 leave the solar system or not?

A report from the Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, claimed earlier today that the long-traveling Voyager 1 spacecraft had departed the solar system:

“It appears that V1 has exited the main solar modulation region, revealing Hydrogen and Helium spectra characteristic of those to be expected in the local interstellar medium.”

But NASA disagrees, according to a statement from Edward Stone, a Voyager project scientist based at Caltech:

“It is the consensus of the Voyager science team that Voyager 1 has not yet left the solar system or reached interstellar space.

In December 2012, the Voyager science team reported that Voyager 1 is within a new region called ‘the magnetic highway,’ where energetic particles changed dramatically. A change in the direction of the magnetic field is the last critical indicator of reaching interstellar space, and that change of direction has not yet been observed.”

Our money’s on the folks over at NASA. Read more on the debate over at Science Now.

Photo: NASA